Make Your Own Delicious Vietnamese Iced Coffee at Home!

Table of Contents

A traditional Vietnamese iced coffee is a sweet, rich treat that’s perfect for a hot summer day. And while it might seem complicated to make, it’s actually quite easy…if you know the secret. In this blog post, I’ll share with you my personal recipe for making the perfect Vietnamese iced coffee, step by step.

If you love iced coffee but are tired of the same old thing, then you’ll love this Vietnamese iced coffee recipe. Vietnamese iced coffee is made with rich, dark roast coffee and condensed milk, and it’s the perfect pick-me-up on a hot summer day.

So grab a cup of your favorite coffee beans and let’s get started!

Step 1: Grind your coffee beans. For Vietnamese iced coffee, you’ll want to use a dark roast coffee bean. I like to use a French roast, but any dark roast will do. You’ll want to grind the beans fairly coarsely, as you would for making cold brew coffee.

Step 2: Place the ground coffee in a filter and place it over your cup or mug. I like to use a paper filter, but you can also use a metal filter if you prefer. Slowly pour about 2 ounces of hot water over the grounds, just enough to wet them. Allow the grounds to bloom for 30 seconds or so before continuing.

Step 3: Now it’s time to begin pouring the rest of the water. Slowly pour about 6-8 ounces of hot water into the filter in a circular motion. Be sure not to pour too quickly, or else the water will become bitter. Continue pouring until the desired amount of coffee has been brewed.

Step 4: Remove the filter and discard the grounds. Add sugar to taste; I like to add about 2 tablespoons. Stir until the sugar has dissolved completely.

Step 5: Pour the coffee into a glass filled with ice and enjoy! You can also add milk or cream if you prefer, but I think it’s delicious black as well.

And there you have it! A delicious Vietnamese iced coffee that you can make right at home. If you follow these simple steps, you’ll be enjoying this sweet and rich treat in no time at all. Thanks for reading, and happy brewing!

Other Posts

About the author

The only one without a beard at Bushy Beard! Maria is a devout coffee lover and what he doesn’t know about making great drinks isn’t worth knowing.

Share this review

Other Interesting Reads

Roasting coffee beans in your ovens isn’t just a way to fill your home with a smell better than the freshest batch of cookies; it’s a centuries-old tradition bringing out rich flavours from simple brown seeds using a skillet. With a standard kitchen oven and some basic gear like a...
Posted byBen West
on
Have you ever wondered where your quality coffee for your morning cup of joe starts its journey? Or how coffee production influences the taste of your favorite coffee drinks? Maybe even pondered about the role of coffee trees in this process? Coffee beans don’t just appear in your local cafe;...
Posted byBen West
on
Soy milk curdling in coffee can be a frustrating experience for those seeking a smooth and creamy beverage. But fear not, for here are some tips and alternatives to prevent this unwanted reaction. The key to understanding curdling is that hot coffee accelerates the lactic acid production by bacteria in...
Posted byBen West
on
Are you struggling with acne and wondering if your daily coffee habit could be to blame? Well, you may be in for a bit of a shock because, in this article, we’ll explore the indirect connection between coffee, milk, sugar, and acne. While coffee itself may not directly cause acne,...
Posted byBen West
on
In the quest for a more sustainable future, many of us are increasingly seeking environmentally friendly alternatives to traditional dairy milk. Understanding the detrimental impact of dairy milk production and transportation on the environment is crucial in making informed choices. With this in mind, oat milk and hazelnut milk emerge...
Posted byBen West
on
Finding the ideal pour-over coffee ratio is crucial for brewing the perfect cup of coffee. Using a consistent coffee-to-water ratio is recommended, with a general rule of 1:17 (coffee-to-water weight ratio). For example, for a Chemex, you would use 42 grams of coffee and approximately 700 grams of water. However,...
Posted byDave Reed
on